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Dog Worms Online Editor

Paws for Fun and Primp Your Pooch with Plerion!

Not content with disguising a worming tablet as a treat – the manufacturers of Plerion are now giving you the chance to disguise your dog as a rock star – and bag yourself a spa holiday or some M&S vouchers in the process! Owners of willful dogs should read on…

As some dog owners will know only too well no matter how wet or cold it may be outside donning even a coat is just a step too far for some mutts let alone a wig and sunglasses. But step aside Gok Wan because with the Plerion website you can become your dog’s personal stylist without having to instigate a battle of wills.

http://www.dogworms.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2010/05/Plerion-image.jpg

Simply visit www.plerion.co.uk and click on ‘Primp Your Pooch’ where you can upload a picture of your dog and start primping! The lucky owner of the pooch with the most online votes will win spa vouchers to the value of £1000 – voting closes on 31st July 2010.

Dog Worms Online Editor

The Importance of Worming Your Dog

Worming should be done at least twice a year. You should also be astute enough to spot the tell tale symptoms if your dog already has a worm infestation. Symptoms can include weight loss, increased appetite, poor coat condition, mucus in the eyes, excessively bad breath, lethargy, constant irritation around the back passage, visible spine, pot belly and in some cases vomiting. If you do suspect your dog as having worms then, although unpleasant, you should closely examine the dogs faeces for evidence of either round or tape worm. Tape worm is rarer and it appears in segments and is flat. The more common round worm is pointed at both ends and looks like small strands of noodles, it is a pale yellow.

If you suspect your dog of having worms but don’t find any evidence in the faeces this does NOT mean that your dog is worm free. Dogs do not always pass worms until they have been well treated. If you are slightly concerned with the prospect of your dog having worms then you must treat it immediately. It is quite common for people to suspect their dog of having worms and yet fail to treat the animal as they believe that the dog is only meant to wormed at a specific date and then wait until that date before worming.

You can not harm a dog by worming it more than twice a year. You must be aware of not worming too much within a short space of time between wormings and even more so with pups but it is not out of the question, in theory, to worm a dog more than 6 times a year if that dog is prone to picking up worms. There are many different worming treatments available. Some are for specifically for the treatment of round worm and others are multi-wormers. It must be noted that dogs can pick up worms other than round and tape but these are rarer.

You will usually find that if your dog still appears to be infested after a good treatment with a quality worming product that your dog may have one of the other forms of worm and vetinary advice should be sought.

>> Recommended: Find out more about Dog Insurance and protect your dog’s health today!

Dog Worms Online Editor

An Introduction to Canine Parasites

Parasites, particularly intestinal worms such as hookworms, tapeworms and roundworms, can be transmitted in a dog’s feces. Some tapeworms have fleas as intermediate hosts: the worm egg must be consumed by a flea to hatch, then the infected flea must be ingested (usually by the dog while grooming itself, but occasionally by a human through various means) for the adult worm to establish itself in the intestines. The worm’s eggs then pass through the intestines and adhere to the nether regions of the dog, and the cycle begins again.
* Intestinal worms cause varying degrees of discomfort.
* Heartworm is a dog parasitoid. It is hard to eliminate and can be fatal; prevention, however, is easily achieved using medication.

As the name suggests, an infected mosquito injects a larva into the dog’s skin, where it migrates to the circulatory system and takes up residence in the pulmonary arteries and heart, growing and reproducing to an alarming degree. The effects on the dog are quite predictable, cardiac failure over a year or two, leading to death. Treatment of an infected dog is difficult, involving an attempt to poison the healthy worm with arsenic compounds without killing the weakened dog, and frequently does not succeed. Prevention is much the better course, via heartworm pills which are fed to the dog and contain a compound which kills the larvae immediately upon infection without harming the dog. Often they are available combined with other parasite preventives.

* Hydatidosis is caused by a cestode Echinococcus. This is usually noticed among dogs, wild dogs, foxes, etc. Due to its importance as a zoonosis, these worms are important to treat. Preventing hydatidosis is an easier task than treating the same. Anthelmintics such as praziquantel may help prevent this condition. Prohibition of the feeding of dogs with uncooked offals may be the best prophylactic measure against these tapeworms.

Dog Worms Online Editor

Most Common Types Of Dog Worms & Their Symptoms

All dogs will have worms at some point in their lives with younger dogs being be more at risk. Preventing and treating worms can be relatively easy especially when caught early. There are five main types of dog worms – whip worm, round worm, hook worm and the tape worm and parasitic flat worm.

Here we explain more about these five types of dog worms, the symptoms of dog worms and their life cycle.

Nematode
(Whip worm, round worm and hook worm).

There are over fifteen thousand species of parasitic nematodes. They can be found in
deserts, in the arctic, in oceanic trenches and in your dog.

Life Cycle:
Anything up to three years.

Symptoms: Weight loss, dull coat, scooting, diarrhoea, vomiting.

Cause: Lack of prevention, infected food, contact with infected carcasses.

Treatment: Oral treatment or spot on treatment, although prevention is more effective.

Luckily in the UK we are not likely to come into contact with some of the more worrying species of parasitic worm and their primary carriers, the mosquito.

Parasitic organisms in general have quite complex life cycles, migrating between several different hosts or locations in the host’s body, including the intestine, the bowel and the heart. Infection usually occurs against biting insects, particularly if it travels orally, but parasites can enter a host via an open cut in unfortunate circumstances. One of the main problems associated with a nematode infestation is the dramatic weight
loss.

Since the nematode will live inside the small intestine of its host for most of the duration of its stay, it can easily feed on anything your dog eats, meaning that the nutrition is being diverted and the worm subsequently grows and grows. In addition, anaemia is also a symptom of roundworm infection. Some species of roundworm are bloodfeeders, either they attach themselves to the wall of the gut and suck blood or are pool feeders whereby the worm bites into the gut wall, creating a pool of blood which
they then digest.

Of particular significance to pet owners is the risk of zoonoses, or the transmission of worms from animals to humans. Toxocara canis (the dog roundworm) eggs may be passed to humans in dog faeces or through touching a dog’s coat.

Treatment and prevention are fairly simple, in fact responsible pet owners should ensure that they pick up their pets’ faeces and that their dogs have a roundworm control routine. Treatments do not prevent the parasites from entering the body, but they do kill the worms before they reach sexual maturity and before they can do any harm. It is recommended that dogs are wormed at least four times a year, however if your dog is in regular contact with children, you may wish to use a monthly roundworm treatment, either in a tablet or spot on product, to ensure the risk of transmission is reduced.

There are many species of intestinal worms in Europe, but some of them are restricted to warm climates. One particularly nasty example is the heart worm. This parasite uses a mosquito as its primary host. Once the mosquito bites a mammal, the larvae are injected into the blood stream. Once the larvae reach the heart of the secondary host, they begin feeding on blood. They then grow and this is where the health problems begin. A serious infestation of heart worm can be fatal for a dog, as the symptoms are hard to spot and treatment can sometimes fail.

In order to reproduce, the heart worm distributes its eggs into the bloodstream of its host, and then it is a matter of chance. If the host is fed on by another mosquito, it is that mosquito’s next meal that will become infected with the eggs. If that animal is already a host then the eggs will be fertilised and a larger infestation will occur. It is therefore important to ensure that your pet is effectively protected bowel and the heart. Infection usually occurs against biting insects, particularly if it travels with you with its PETS Passport to continental Europe or further afield.

Cestoda
(Tape worm, parasitic flat worm)

Certain tape worms can grow up to 80ft long inside their host, causing potentially fatal
intestinal blockages.

Life Cycle: Up to 3 years

Symptoms: Weight loss, dull coat, scooting, diarrhoea, vomiting.

Cause: Lack of prevention, infected food, contact with infected carcasses, contact with contaminated soil.

Treatment: Oral treatment or spot on treatment, prevention is recommended. The symptoms and treatment of this type of parasite are very similar to that of the nematode, although the Cestoda have a different adult morphology which is more often segmented, meaning that they can break up without dying. They also posses male and female reproductive equipment, meaning that they can breed independently and do not rely on cross infestations to reproduce.

Cestoda
(Tape worm, parasitic flat worm)

Certain tape worms can grow up to 80ft long inside their host, causing potentially fatal intestinal blockages.

Life Cycle: Up to 3 years

Symptoms: Weight loss, dull coat, scooting, diarrhoea, vomiting.

Cause: Lack of prevention, infected food, contact with infected carcasses, contact with contaminated soil.

Treatment: Oral treatment or spot on treatment, prevention is recommended. The symptoms and treatment of this type of parasite are very similar to that of the nematode, although the Cestoda have a different adult morphology which is more often segmented, meaning that they can break up without dying. They also posses male and female reproductive equipment, meaning that they can breed independently and do not rely on cross infestations to reproduce.

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